‘Hamilton’: Historic hip hop Broadway mainstay gets powerful, poignant production

It’s been over a decade since Lin-Manuel Miranda stood before the president to perform a hip hop song about the life of Alexander Hamilton. Little did he know that one day that simple song would lead to one of the most celebrated pieces of media of the 21st Century, the record-breaking Tony, Grammy, and Pulitzer Prize-winning musical Hamilton, which netted upwards of thousands of dollars a seat in its prime. After nearly a decade, this musical wonder has finally made its way to Austin audiences thanks to Broadway in Austin, who bring in a talented cast of Broadway vets along with other talented touring players, to create a polished, powerful production that will take audiences on an emotional, engaging journey through the life of one of the most underappreciated founding fathers, full of witty, raw, and well-written tunes, clever, subtle choreography, and smart direction that’s sure to satisfy even the most ardent Hamilton fan.

Even with the best tunes and finest supporting cast, the piece would fall apart without a steady force at its center, and thankfully Joseph Morales imbues the titular protagonist with a sensitivity that makes him likable, even in his darkest moments, all leveled out with a cocky confidence that makes him a believable Lothario. His soulful voice also gives his songs a different flavor than fans may be familiar with, a style that keeps the flair of Miranda’s delivery, while injecting a touch of extra heart into some of the more emotional moments. Morales makes smart choices throughout, creating a performance something distinctive, effervescent, and riveting.

Of course, Hamilton’s gonna need his right hand men (and women), and the major actors with whom he surrounds himself all bring something brilliant and unique to the table. Though he lacks the powerful, belting prowess of Leslie Odom Jr (what actor doesn’t), what Nik Walker brings to the roll of Aaron Burr is an emotional verisimilitude, a staunch confidence of character that helps the audience connect with his spirit. In many ways the musical Hamilton paints Burr as a very sympathetic character, and through his vulnerable performance, Walker helps the audience see into Burr’s heart and soul. Speaking of vulnerability, Erin Clemons brings tears of many shapes and sizes throughout, thanks to her sensitive performance as Hamilton’s wife Eliza. Her arc is one of the most heartbreaking in the show, and Clemons carries it with aplomb, selling each feeling as if it she’s ripping it from her own chest. When she belts out “Burn” in one of the show’s most gut-wrenching moments, prepare for the aisles to become flooded with the audience’s tears.

The production is also littered with several winning supporting performances. In particular, Fergie L. Phillipe, in the dual role of Hercules Mulligan and James Madison, steals most of the scenes he’s in, even if he’s only in them for a moment. He’s fantastic at bringing out the humor in every situation, even if it’s just a single word. Another show-stopper is Jon Patrick Walker as King George, who’s over-the-top personality is perfect for the haughty king, and every time he appears on stage one can’t help but smile. We also mustn’t forget Kyle Scatliffe, playing the dual role of the talented revolutionary Marquis de Lafayette, as well as the cocky Congressman Thomas Jefferson, and he flounces into both with a cock-of-the walk confidence that makes him instantly likable. He also has the talent to balance this cockiness with the believability, never straying into over-the-top caricature.

Hamilton has become a legend in its time, a modern masterpiece, beloved by people around the world, so this touring production has a lot to live up, but luckily Broadway in Austin has brought us a polished production of this Broadway wonder. Full of toe-tapping tunes, pitch-perfect performances, and some real heart, this production will surprise any audience, whether they’re super-fans who’ve memorized every word of the cast album, or newcomers who barely know the play’s historical backbone.

Photo courtesy of Joan Marcus.