‘Waitress’ is a hearty slice of Southern charm, with a big dollop of heart

Though it doesn’t get much attention today, when it was released 2007, the film Waitress was a bit of a revelation, one of the most celebrated romantic comedies of its time, proving Keri Russell had a life beyond Felicity. Though its fame faded in the years that followed, the story gained a new life thanks to the team of award-winning pop princess Sara Bareilles and writer Jesse Nelson, who turned the indie favorite into a Broadway phenomenon.  After winning several Tonys, the Broadway is finally making its way to Austin stages thanks to Broadway Across America, who bring all the frothy joy, toe-tapping tunes, and tear-jerking drama, along with a talented cast of professionals that carry the music, and the emotion, all the way to the rafters.

Waitress takes us to a quiet diner in an unnamed Southern town, and follows the travails of the titular waitress Jenna, whose kindness is matched only by her troubles. Married to an abusive husband, pregnant with a baby she didn’t expect, and barely making ends meet, her only source of solace is also her greatest talent: pie-making. When a handsome doctor and a pie competition enter the picture, a way out begins to take form, but can she shake the responsibilities of her life in order to make a new start? The resulting journey is charming, dramatic, and surprisingly ribald, with an extended cast that adds fascinating and fun texture to the proceedings, and some great tunes that help to put words to the surprisingly complex emotions of the characters. It tackles some serious issues, but always keeps things light, showing that hope and friendship can help you through even the darkest of nights.

Finding the right Jenna is a tricky balance. You need someone who brings not just charm but a certain strength of personality, a stony resolve that endears her to the audience, even as her faults come to the fore, someone with solid comedic chops, but who’s also able to carry the dramatic weight this narrative brings .  Christine Dwyer brings no shortage of adorable quirk to her role, but there’s always something more going on behind her eyes, a strength that keeps her going through all her hardships. She’s the anchor that keeps the goofy cast grounded, while still bringing plenty of humor in her own right. The chemistry with strikes up not just with the hunky, but sensitive doctor (played with a delightful charisma by Steven Good), but also with her two fellow waitresses, creating a living, breathing cast that’s never less than lovable.

It’s always a delight when an actor can build a small role into something show-stopping, and Jeremy Morse is doing just that from the moment he appears as the foppish, but persistent, Ogie. He tackles the role with an ecstatic energy, that radiates out palpably to the entire audience, especially in his opening song, “Never Ever Getting Rid of Me”, one of the show’s best numbers, a spirited, toe-tapping tune, which instantly endears him to viewers. His vigorous spirit plays perfectly with the awkward, quirky energy that Jessie Shelton bring to her role as the shy waitress Dawn, the two of them creating some of the best chemistry in the show. These two play so well together that, when they’re off stage, the audience can’t help but sit in anticipation for their next appearance.

Waitress isn’t as emotionally devastating or socially relevant as many of its contemporaries, but sometimes a charming, fun slice of hilarity and heart makes for a well balanced meal, and there are few musicals that offer this up more heartily. It’s one of most fun evenings you’ll have at the theatre, and there’s certainly nothing wrong with that, so grab your tickets and make sure not to miss this sweet little piece of romantic comedy gold.

Waitress is playing through Sunday the 27th, so be sure to grab your tickets fast at Austin.broadway.com.

Photo courtesy of Broadway Across America.