Summer Stock’s “Sister Act” is a stunning display of fresh young talent

Some of my favorite productions over my years of reviewing have come from the humble stages of Summer Stock Austin. Those in the know surely have fond memories of their productions of Little Shop of Horrors, Sweeney Todd, or Legally Blonde, or even their legendary joint-production of Chess, if you were lucky enough to attend. Though the loss of Michael McKelvey hit the company hard, Summer Stock is still one of the highlights of my year, and this continues with their latest, “Sister Act”. I will be the first to say, “Sister Act” is far from my favorite musical, as the numbers don’t have the X-Factor of some of it contemporaries, and it’ss never funny enough nor deep enough to strike either side of the “comedy/drama” coin in any memorable way. That said, what Summer Stock, and director Daniel Adams, bring to the table is a group of talented young people on both sides of the desk, from cast to crew, each with a passion to create the best performance they can in just two weeks. It’s always staggering to behold just what they’re able to create with such a meager budget and tight time constraints, and despite technical issues, they’ve pulled out an soulful, solid production of this Broadway staple.

“Sister Act”, based on the hit film of the same name, follows Deloris, a singer turned moll turned informant, who, after running afoul of her violent gangster boyfriend, goes into hiding in the most unconventional place imaginable: a convent. This leads to some growing pains, as the larger-than-life Deloris must come to terms with her new staid, hallowed home, but when she’s put in charge of the convent’s choir, she proves that some lights shine much too brightly to be hidden under a bushel. Forgoing much of the joyful noise of the original film for somewhat lackluster songs by Alan Menken and Glen Slater, which don’t stand out as either’s best work, the musical still holds its own thanks to a solid premise and some whacky hijinks.

From the moment she arrives on stage, it’s obvious that Micaela Lamas is a star. She brings a sassy, soulful energy to the role of Deloris, reminiscent of Lizzo or comedian Nicole Byer, delighting with refreshing vocal chops and comedic timing in equal measure. She makes each of her numbers look easy, injecting them with an exhilarating exuberance that is infectious to behold, even if the songs themselves don’t shine quite as brightly. Even in the most ho-hum of numbers, Lamas is able to inject her own brand of vivacity into the proceedings, keeping the audience rapt and the action moving. She has the entire musical resting on her shoulders, and she attacks it with such aplomb that she makes it seems like the easiest thing in the world.

One of the true joys of attending Summer Stock each year is discovering talent on the rise. Much like the character she portrays, when first meet Maryanna Tollemache as Sister Mary Robert, she’s quiet and meek, mostly going ignored, but the moment she hits her first belt, you’ll be falling out of your chair. Tollemache’s instrument contains both strength and clarity, and even with a faulty mic she still blasts open the doors with her power. When she finally gets a chance to sing a song of her own, she demands our attention, injecting real pathos while keeping her voice clear and solid. She doesn’t slack in the acting department either, as she’s able to play both modest and timid, as well as cool and rebellious, taking on both with an admirable flair. She’s an actress to keep one’s eyes on, and as only a senior in high school, there’s no telling the heights she’ll hit in the years to come.

I had my reservations when Abby Holtfort first appeared as the Mother Superior. Though I had seen her give fine performances in the past, there is always a concern in young casts in how older characters would be handled, as taking on someone of both such an advanced age, with that much gravitas, can often be a challenge for young performers. Holtfort put all my doubts to rest, however, as the actress carries herself with a grace and solemnity that instantly endears her to the audience, especially when placed against the larger-the-life persona that Lamas exudes. She makes for the perfect foil, and watching these two leads interact is one of the true highlights of the piece.

Of course, I can’t leave here without mentioning the stellar work done by David Pena, Tristan Tierney, and and Jaiden Collier. The three portray a trio of bumbling gangsters, and they steal nearly every scene they’re in. They provide a pleasant diversion from the convent antics, and create some of the best set pieces in the production. In particular, Tierney proves himself to be a name to remember, as the actor brings in the charisma that made him such a hit in “How to Succeed in Business” to give his mobster a smarmy, greasy charm that’s undeniably hilarious.

“Sister Act” is far from the best musical that’s graced Summer Stock stages, but there’s no denying that the level of talent on display is colossal. From the smallest bit player to the play’s star, each brings wit, zeal, and an undeniable passion to their performance that’s hard not to love, which elevates even the most mediocre of pieces. I’ve never come away disappointed in a Summer Stock Austin production, and that certainly won’t start now, so be sure to check out these young performers giving it their all.

Photo courtesy of Summer Stock Austin .