Filigree’s ‘100 Planes’ is subtle, yet powerful, examination of women in the military

As our military industrial complex becomes more integrated in modern times, what does it really take for a woman to succeed as an officer? That’s the question at the heart of Lila Rose Kaplan’s intriguing work, 100 Planes, being given a worthy interpretation by Filigree Theatre and director Elizabeth V. Newman. Here, we follow Lieutenant Kay McClure, a plucky, awkward, but incredibly skilled young pilot who has always dreamed of flying, and who idolizes the famous pilot, Major Anne Clarkson. When Clarkson begins looking for recruits to pilot her new, top-of-the-line hybrid plane, Kay becomes obsessed with taking the spot, but does she have the drive to follow through on all the hardships that will come her way, and is she willing to sacrifice the ones she loves, and even a bit of herself, to make her dreams a reality? Though it may go overly dramatic in its last act, 100 Planes is an intriguing look at a sector not often examined in theatrical works, and does so with a subtle, nuanced hand that not only shines a light on to the darknesses within the complex itself, but also examines the toll the pressure of working in said complex can have on a person.

One of the most intriguing elements of 100 Planes is the way it examines femininity in masculine spaces. Early on we’re shown that in the military complex in which the action plays, femininity is liability, an invitation for abuse, seen as a frivolity to the higher-ups. It’s fascinating to see the moments when our characters are allowed to show their feminine qualities, whether it’s Kay’s attachment to her heart pillow, or something as small as Major Clarkson’s gift of a rose to her girlfriend. On the flip side, however, much of the play’s tension lies in the explosive reaction that occurs when one tries to tamp down or eliminate their traditionally feminine characteristics, as part of the incendiary finale of the play can be seen as a reaction to an unbridled pursuit of a masculine ideal. That our protagonist only finds the peace she seeks by embracing her softer, emotional qualities can’t be seen as a coincidence.

Taking on the characters in 100 Planes is no small feat, as each of them, by nature of their employment, is forced to tone down their emotions in order to fit in to the military environment. This forces most of the actors’ decisions to be subtle ones, to play with the affect in ways that won’t detract from the verisimilitude of their environs. This can, at times, effect chemistry between the two romantic leads, as their romance is forced at times to play against what at times feels like a brick wall, but it’s to lead actress Alani Rose Chock’s credit that the relationship feels genuine. Chock injects an awkwardness into her character that makes even her most buttoned-up moments endearing, as one can tell there’s always a sweetness underlining even her most rigid moments.

Brennan Patrick, for his part, plays as the perfect counterpart to these women. If the play is an examination of femininity in masculine places, the sensitivity and emotional nature of Patrick’s character seems to be exploration of these feminine qualities in men. Though he never comes off as effete, his deep adoration for Chock’s Kay, and his resolute pursuit of truth and peace make for an interesting counterpoint to the stern masculinity at play in many of the corners of military industrial complex in which this play spends most of its time. Patrick is an excellent counterweight to a play that can come off as a bit stern and overbearing at times, providing an affecting, emotional core to the piece that’s quite refreshing.

If we’re speaking of emotional arcs, no actor pulls theirs off more effectively than Brittany Flurry as Monique. From her earliest moments, it’s clear that Monique is a figure that’s been ground down by the complex, forced into her surly disposition by both the military and an overly-determined lover. She’s been pulled along and pushed around so long, the chip on her shoulder has become a yoke she’s forced to bear. Watching her break down near the end of the play’s run is one of the most powerful moments in the production, and Flurry sells it with aplomb, bringing a slight tear to even the hardened audience member.

Though many of the supporting performance are quite impressive, none of this would work without fine performances from our two leads, the hardened Major and her promising new recruit. Their relationships is an intriguing one, as the harshness of Major Clarkson, played with gruff determination by Karen Harrison, is buoyed beautifully by Chock’s plucky resolve to become the best. Their dance is a measured one, an intricate waltz that becomes more treacherous as the play continues, with motives being questioned and allegiances changing with every movement. These characters are slightly let down in the later stages of the work, as a few predictable, overly-dramatic elements take them away from situations that could be more emotionally satisfying, but one the whole, these two play their complicated game with an intelligence and drive that’s admirable.

Though it doesn’t quite stick the landing, 100 Planes is a powerful look at how women fight to survive in masculine spaces, and the disastrous effects this struggle can have on the psyche. The play forces the performers to step up to a higher level of emotional intelligence, and they mostly rise to meet it, creating a nuanced piece of drama that’s sure to leave the audience shaken.

100 Planes is playing at the Mastrogorge Theatre through April 13th. For more information, and to purchase tickets, visit filigreetheatre.com.

Photo courtesy of Steve Rogers.